SuperJail Warden
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unnamednewbie13 wrote:

Big?

LAPD officer killed during training was beaten during mob simulation, mother claims
https://www.yahoo.com/now/lapd-officer- … 01124.html
There is actually a video of the "training session" that was released

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iT0pWOldIjc

Spoiler (highlight to read):
My dad said he actually witnessed something like this happen when he was in the military. Some guys threw a blanket over the head of another soldier and punched him in the face a bunch of times. Why is the military/police like this?

Last edited by SuperJail Warden (2022-06-27 14:24:16)

https://i.imgur.com/xsoGn9X.jpg
unnamednewbie13
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tax dollars at work

SuperJail Warden
Gone Forever
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He is fun though what you eventually get is crazy people harassing people in the subway for spare change.

Maybe they can make a permit system for subway performers.
https://i.imgur.com/xsoGn9X.jpg
unnamednewbie13
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Did they have to break his stuff?
SuperJail Warden
Gone Forever
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Yeah that unfortunate. I hope he has a GoFundMe
https://i.imgur.com/xsoGn9X.jpg
unnamednewbie13
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https://i.imgur.com/7BeD4gO.jpg

Being questioned by police at a traffic stop about your daily routine in the best of times is discomfiting enough. Do you shut the fuck up (#stfuf) and risk aggravating them, or just give them just enough satisfaction to go about your day.

I've been pulled over for all sorts of traffic stuff including outright lies (camera confirms that it was indeed a yellow light, stop fishing). "What are you doing in town today?" "Do you have any weapons in your car?" "Why are you out here at night?" U-turn on an abandoned rural road and the lights go on at the horizon like they were triggered by some sixth fucking sense, omg just leave me alone. Stop asking questions I don't have to answer, making me have to choose between pissing you off and not possibly incriminating myself. Is this the job police won't want to do?

Been audience to the weird questioning as a child passenger too. Once with a load of Christmas presents, visible on the seat. "So what are you guys doing?" What do you think?!

I've never been stalked by gang members and drug dealers. I've been followed around by police on more than one occasion through town. Was he taking notes? "Stopped at the gas station and then bought a sandwich at the grocery store, seems harmless." Why do we need to pay officers for this? Go stop an assault, or an actual porch pirate.

Wherever you are Hollis, fuck off lol, I know you'd have something defensive to say about it.

Dilbert_X
The X stands for
+1,786|5534|eXtreme to the maX
I spent some time watching youtube videos of people taking on asshole cops.
Personally I think its easier to just say yes sir no sir and file a complaint later.

My favourite was a Saudi guy who used to fly in his Lambo with Saudi plates, do tours of America and absorb all the spittle-flinging cops.

"Why can't I read your license plate"
"You can't read arabic?"
"You're not allowed to have an arabic plate"
"Yes I am, I'm a visitor, here's the paperwork"

And some kids who got tired of an asshole cop telling them where the couldn't cycle, read up on the ordinances and filmed themselves telling him to get lost.

Whats interesting is:
How many cops are on power trips
That there never seem to be cops to deal with actual crime but dozens turn out and have hours to stand around when someone tells a cop to get lost.
Русский военный корабль, иди на хуй!
uziq
Member
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obviously it's a very stupid idea to make a principled stand against the 'state of things' against a cop in an actual scenario. recording snide youtube videos isn't going to change diddly squat. on a good day you get a polite and patient cop who humours your 'i've read the handbook of the law' airs. on a bad day you're going to get stuffed in the back of a patrol car and nobody, not even the local news, is going to care about it.

you know what can work? organized protests against the police. large movements. you heard of a thing called BLM? they have this novel idea of defunding useless and overfunded police departments and redirecting the money to mental health care, community schemes, outreach programmes, etc.

fancy that. just imagine !

Last edited by uziq (2022-07-19 04:59:01)

unnamednewbie13
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Having any kind of footage you can safely store away is probably optimal for dealings with police and courts, though. You don't have to make a show of it either.
SuperJail Warden
Gone Forever
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You have to be a dummy to want to make a scene with a cop. Just be polite, friendly, apologize and you might actually get away with whatever you did as long as it was minor and/or you have a cop who isn't a total asshole.

I suspect cops are so worn down by all of the this post-George Floyd stuff that many departments are okay with the cops taking their foot off the gas and being less aggressive. Of course that is problematic since property and violent crime is now spiking. Broken windows policing
https://i.imgur.com/xsoGn9X.jpg
uziq
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broken windows was utterly disproven.
uziq
Member
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SuperJail Warden wrote:

I suspect cops are so worn down by all of the this post-George Floyd stuff
i suspect a good number of cops have 'doubled down' on their identity as pig-men now that they feel under increased scrutiny and public pressure. esprit de corps and that. isn't that what 'blue lives matter' and all the Punisher memes are about?

a certain type of person when they come under very public criticism tends to take it very badly and become defensive and angry. and i would suggest that that sort of person is precisely the type of personality who is drawn to being a cop and positions of small authority.
unnamednewbie13
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uziq wrote:

broken windows was utterly disproven.
There are a lot of broken windows around some of the towns I visit, way more than I remember from years back. This happens with or without a BLM or Antifa presence, though. Blame on them falls apart under scrutiny, and I guess in some cases vandalism was done by the "crisis actors" the right loves to talk about so much (wasn't there an auto shop where a proud boy or off duty cop shattered the windows of near a BLM demonstration?)

Know what coincides with a lot of damaged commercial property? Poverty.

I have heard anecdotes of white people being harassed by black people, but when I pressed it turns out they weren't harassed at or around BLM events, or only vaguely in association (there was a guy holding a sign 10 blocks away).

Meanwhile the literal shit smearing, assassin-wannabe braggarts at the Jan 6 insurrection? It was so long ago, we need to move past that now.
uziq
Member
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broken windows was a NYC policing strategy publicized by the charlatan writer and theorizer of banal insipidities, malcolm gladwell, in one of his airport departure lounge books.

i think he cooked it up with a bunch of spurious sociological and criminological research that went out of vogue almost as soon as it hit the journals.

iirc it was the idea that, if you strictly enforced and policed all forms of anti-social behaviour, cracking down extra hard on small environmental things like vandalism and street tagging ("broken windows"), then incidences of serious crime would go down too. making people respect and care for their environment apparently solved the causes of major antisocial behaviour and poverty; or, put another way, living in an area with broken windows and signs of urban decay soon leads to criminal behaviour.

all a load of nonsense, of course.
unnamednewbie13
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If the Uvalde shooter had a can of spray paint, maybe the police could have acted sooner.
uziq
Member
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In 1818 an all-party committee in the Tory-dominated House of Commons held that the creation of a permanent police force was unacceptable: ‘Among a free people the very proposal would be rejected with abhorrence.’ Robert Peel ignored this advice and set up the Metropolitan Police in 1829. In 1833, a meeting was called at Coldbath Fields near Gray’s Inn Road by the National Union of the Working Classes to object to the new police force and call for the extension of the franchise. Lord Melbourne, the Whig home secretary, banned the gathering and ordered the police to break it up if necessary. A police constable called Robert Culley was killed during the subsequent riot, but the jurors at his inquest claimed that the ‘conduct of the police was ferocious, brutal and unprovoked by the people’. They reached a verdict of justifiable homicide, reflecting the general feeling that policing did not reduce the risk of public gatherings turning into disorder but increased it.

When did it become career suicide for any politician to question whether protesters should be subjected to hostile policing? In Charged: How the Police Try to Suppress Protest (Verso, £18.99) the criminal defence solicitor Matt Foot and the documentary filmmaker Morag Livingstone argue that the pivotal moment was in January 1983, when the Conservative home secretary William Whitelaw introduced the Public Order Manual of Tactical Options and Related Matters, a classified handbook drawn up by the Home Office and the Association of Chief Police Officers, which permitted the use of ‘military-style tactics’ against protesters. In Warrington in November that year, Eddy Shah, the owner of the Warrington Messenger, asked the police to disperse pickets organised by the printworkers’ union, the NGA, after he sacked six employees who had gone on strike. Riot police ordered journalists to stop filming and then charged the picket line, first on foot, and then in Range Rovers, driven at speed. The ‘use of vehicles to disperse a riotous crowd’ was one of the tactics authorised by the new manual.

The manual also allowed senior officers to equip the police with the truncheons and short shields used during the miners’ strike at Orgreave in June 1984, when six thousand police, led by mounted officers, repeatedly charged into a crowd of five thousand picketers. Many were injured and 95 picketers were charged with riot, which at the time carried a life sentence. At their trial, Michael Mansfield’s cross-examination of the assistant chief constable of South Yorkshire, Anthony Clement, revealed the existence of the Public Order Manual. The judge ordered some pages to be released, containing ‘questionable tactics, involving the use of dogs and horses and the banging of shields, and the authorisation to use truncheons to “incapacitate” people just for being present’. Foot and Livingstone draw on Home Office documents to show that there was vigorous internal debate as to which tactics were legitimate. A Home Office advisory committee warned against the use of dogs in ‘confronting a crowd’. The Scarman Report after the Brixton riots of 1981 called for an end to the tactic of banging shields in order to frighten rioters before attacking them – it showed, the report said, a loss of control by the police. The manual permitted it anyway.

In addition to the documents released by the National Archives under the thirty-year rule, tens of thousands more have been disclosed to the Undercover Policing Inquiry chaired by Sir John Mitting. The inquiry was ordered in 2015 by Theresa May, then home secretary, after it was revealed that the police had spied on the family and friends of Stephen Lawrence, who was murdered in Eltham in South-East London in 1993 in a racist attack by a gang of white teenagers. A few months after the murder, a protest was held calling for the closure of the British National Party headquarters in Welling, not far from where the attack took place. A crowd estimated at anywhere between fifteen and sixty thousand was trapped in a dead end and attacked by the police, who used truncheons and horses. The chief steward on the march, Julie Waterson, was struck on the head; photographs show her addressing the crowd in a white denim jacket spattered with blood. The officers who took the operational decisions that day – Paul Condon, David Osland and Hugh Blenkin – were also central to police liaison with Lawrence’s family. Condon, commissioner of the Metropolitan Police at the time, visited the spycops unit a week after Welling, taking a bottle of whisky for each of the undercover officers.

The use of police batons at demonstrations didn’t start in the 1980s: they are likely to have been responsible for the deaths of, for example, Kevin Gately, killed by a blow to the head during a protest against the National Front in Red Lion Square, Holborn in 1974, and Blair Peach, who also died of a head injury, received at an Anti-Nazi League demonstration in Southall in 1979. The new Public Order Bill will probably pass, but the best protection against arbitrary policing isn’t the passage or repeal of legislation, but a demonstration of public feeling powerful enough to persuade the worst police officers that it would be prudent not to swing the baton (no matter what their manual says). The movement against the Iraq War contained any number of people willing to confront the state. They were undesirables in the eyes of the authorities, but as long as most British people supported them, the police kept their distance.
unnamednewbie13
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Bunch of Burgessian droogs.
Dilbert_X
The X stands for
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Erm, the police in the UK carried batons from day one.
Русский военный корабль, иди на хуй!
unnamednewbie13
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Associated Press
Ex-officer sentenced in rough arrest of woman with dementia
https://news.yahoo.com/ex-officer-sente … 10118.html

FORT COLLINS, Colo. (AP) — A former Colorado police officer who did not stop another officer from being rough with a 73-year-old woman with dementia was sentenced Friday to 45 days in jail and three years of probation.

Daria Jalali earlier pleaded guilty in the arrest of Karen Garner in Loveland, about 50 miles (80 kilometers) north of Denver, in 2020. She had faced up to 60 days in jail for failing to intervene, a crime created by lawmakers as part of a police reform bill passed during protests over racial injustice and police brutality in 2020.

Former officer Austin Hopp arrested Garner after she left a store without paying for about $14 worth of items. Police body camera video released last year shows Garner repeatedly saying that she was trying to go home.

After Garner turns away from him, the footage shows Hopp grabbing her arm and pushing her to the ground and handcuffing her. Later, he pushed her against the hood of his car and, after she tries to turn around, he moves her bent left up arm up near her head. Soon after, Garner began to slump toward the ground. Jalali, who arrived after Garner was handcuffed, says, “Stand up! We’re not going to hold you.”

Hopp was sentenced in May to five years in prison for his treatment of Garner. Loveland settled a lawsuit filed by Garner for $3 million. Her family has said her condition deteriorated after her arrest and she requires around-the-clock care as a result.

Jalali apologized to Garner and her family in court, the Loveland Reporter-Herald reported. She told Judge Joshua Lehman that she thought Garner was intoxicated and believed Garner was only complaining about her handcuffs so she could get out of them.

“I wanted to be a good police officer and my heart was in the right place, but I still came up short,” she said.

Jalali's lawyer, Anna Geigle, said Loveland police and another department let her stay on the job despite a pattern of poor performance recorded in her personnel files. A neuropsychological evaluation showed Jalali did not have the “psychological makeup” to act with the precision and awareness expected of police officers, she said.
What a toxic job. Try and stop a fellow officer, get choked out and then ostracized by the rest of the department. Career over. Don't stop a cop, welcome to being a part of the problem, and sometimes go to jail if a judge doesn't cover for you.

I do believe that some people join up with the best of intentions, but some people also leave the police academy or quit the force after enough exposure to the culture.
Dilbert_X
The X stands for
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Its really hard to deal with asshole behaviour by your colleagues from inside an organisation.

did not have the “psychological makeup”
Wasn't part of the team.
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unnamednewbie13
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At $249 per day, prison stays leave ex-inmates deep in debt
https://news.yahoo.com/249-per-day-pris … 14651.html

HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — Two decades after her release from prison, Teresa Beatty feels she is still being punished.

When her mother died two years ago, the state of Connecticut put a lien on the Stamford home she and her siblings inherited. It said she owed $83,762 to cover the cost of her 2 1/2 year imprisonment for drug crimes.

Now, she's afraid she'll have to sell her home of 51 years, where she lives with two adult children, a grandchild and her disabled brother.

“I'm about to be homeless,” said Beatty, 58, who in March became the lead plaintiff in a lawsuit challenging the state law that charges prisoners $249 a day for the cost of their incarceration. “I just don't think it's right, because I feel I already paid my debt to society. I just don't think it's fair for me to be paying twice.”
So dumb it even incurs a "debt to society."

Hmm, how to get $83k for that lien …
… how about drug sales?

Connecticut’s partial repeal went into effect July 1. The state is projected to collect about $5.5 million less per year from ex-prisoners because of the change.

State Sen. John Kissel, the top Republican on the legislature's Judiciary Committee, said he opposed the repeal passed by the Democratic majority, but might support reforms like allowing inmates to pay off debt in installments.

Kissel said that while Beatty's situation tugs at one's heartstrings, “Everybody has issues.”
"Everybody has issues." Dilbertesque!

How is it "tough on crime" to drive ex-cons into perhaps criminal desperation, I wonder. Is it really not that they want to be tough on crime? Is money involved?
Cybargs
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wait hole up
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SuperJail Warden
Gone Forever
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Police fatally shooting a guy

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IR8KliyFlNY

Again, the end result of what happens in a place where concealed carry/gun nut culture reigns.
https://i.imgur.com/xsoGn9X.jpg

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