unnamednewbie13
Moderator
+2,053|6763|PNW

@warman - ram consumption between 10 and 11 is pretty samey. you can look up benchmarks between 10 and 11 on fresh and updated installs, comparable performance and ram usage that you might notice only if you're looking at the numbers. I remember game frames were like +/- 2% between the two on one multi-game benchmark, numbers that could also occur between two separate tests on the exact same system.

win 10 eol is like 2025, so you can sit on it for a bit.

@dilbert - people have been making fun of MS for the forever-10 fail since the announcement of 11. I also find it funny, but whatever. I really would not care to be using windows 10 for the rest of my life anyway. sit down to a computer with dos 6 or windows 3.1 installed sometime and ask yourself if you'd want that in your daily computing. I prefer not having to manually configure my coms, irqs, and startup files each time I want optimal performance in a different software, thank you.
Dilbert_X
The X stands for
+1,810|6097|eXtreme to the maX
Install went through for free at least, apparently this just happens if you have OEM Windows, thank fuck anyway.

MS Could get a lot more credit if they would either continue supporting old OSs, or allow a free upgrade path until the hardware can't take it (which they seem to do but tell you they don't, very weird)

Few things more annoying than having perfectly good hardware nerfed because something MS something something.
Русский военный корабль, иди на хуй!
unnamednewbie13
Moderator
+2,053|6763|PNW

I'd rather not have Windows OEM set to $10k just so it gets security updates for the next century.

'Perfectly good hardware' is subjective. It's mildly annoying that I can't install Windows 11 on machines without the chip, but that's becoming a pretty good lazy indicator of obsolescence.

I have 'perfectly good hardware' I probably couldn't install Windows 10 on either.
Dilbert_X
The X stands for
+1,810|6097|eXtreme to the maX
My parents do nothing more than web access and email, why do they need a new chipset for this?

Can't MS fix their software?
Русский военный корабль, иди на хуй!
unnamednewbie13
Moderator
+2,053|6763|PNW

Well let's put it this way. Windows 10 got a decade of roadmapped support for like usd$120 a pop. In some cases, $0 when they offered it as free update. By standards of software and hardware companies, this is a long time. There has to be some practical limit. Similarly, free transition offered for 11. Granted, Microsoft has the benefit of keeping users within its ecosystem, but still.

Spoiler (highlight to read):
I've mentioned before working with (old) people who are still happy using stuff like Vista and XP, and would even still be on 98 and ME if I hadn't put my foot down and make a nuisance of myself over it. Guess who (who gets their educated opinion on these matters so often disregarded) gets to periodically sweep away all the nasty bugs they pick up, and correct the 'fixes' they attempt, and (fully) uninstall the shady fix-it software they try, and address other ignorant, negligent tinkering? I've written reams of alerts and upgrade proposals. There is small progress, but it's a ton of work.
/take it to the job thread

Computers eventually need replacing, yo. At some point in a machine's lifecycle, it should be relegated to the closet. The TPM chip requirement, among others can be annoying and feel arbitrary, but write it off as a natural evolution in the arms race against ever more sophisticated malware. I would urge more people to upgrade into that (or a Mac, PACMAN notwithstanding), especially if they might do anything like shop or bank online (as often done by people who "just want to send emails and browse the web"). Even in Oz, replacing a browse-the-internet laptop with another can't be that much of a financial burden, can it?
_j5689_
Dreads & Bergers
+364|6708|Riva, MD

SuperJail Warden wrote:

Is there a single good reason to upgrade to Win 11?
Significantly better support for HDR monitors but other than that, not really

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