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uziq
Member
+388|2307
hardboiled, close behind pickled, is by far the most heinous way to consume an egg.
KEN-JENNINGS
I am all that is MOD!
+2,905|5487|949

pirana6 wrote:

I think putting them into an ice-bath immediately after boiling helps? Honestly I can't tell which permutation of 15 different "life hacks" actually help with peeling, but something does. Sometimes you get the peel-in-two-piece-of-shell eggs and sometimes you pull off so much white with the shell that you end up just holding the yoke and get pissed off.
My condolences.

Peel under running water though, that shit helps get all the residual shell off.
I put them in an ice bath yeah. This was squarely my own cooking fuck up. I eat them as snacks at work or on the go so i don't always have the ability to peel under a sink. I know how to dial them in, I was just side tracked on this batch.
uziq
Member
+388|2307
a source of protein ‘on the go’ is called a nut. i recommend it. stop befouling train carriages and office canteens with your malodorous aborted ducks.
KEN-JENNINGS
I am all that is MOD!
+2,905|5487|949

I don't ride a lot of trains, and I sure as shit am not eating a boiled egg on one.

Stop trying to gatekeep my nutrition bro. You know you have a few boiled soy eggs in that Korean gift basket.
pirana6
Go Cougs!
+638|5145|Washington St.
I put bacon in my thrice yearly egg salad sandwich a few weeks ago. It's been done a million times before, but damn I don't know why I wasn't doing that sooner.

HB eggs
A few slices of bacon REAL crisp (none of that flacid-dong crap. COOK IT)
2 celery stalks
mayo
s & p

and toast
DesertFox-
The very model of a modern major general
+757|5539|United States of America
Does BF2s have a recipe or other kind of cooking thread? We've missed out on a crucial market share.
unnamednewbie13
Moderator
+1,881|5626|USA

uziq wrote:

hardboiled, close behind pickled, is by far the most heinous way to consume an egg.
I have never had the desire to try a pickled egg.

Hardboiled can be nice depending on usage. Sliced for sandwich, cubed for salad, or a bit of salt on a couple as a side dish is nice. Fast to make and easily portable. I've got a hardboiled egg cooker that makes little scorch marks by the pinpricks and makes them smell different, but the taste is the same. Still prefer boiling.

I prefer scrambled or omelette, followed by over easy, in toast, or in fried rice. CBA with devilled. Hardboiled is probably my favorite cold, though.

DesertFox- wrote:

Does BF2s have a recipe or other kind of cooking thread? We've missed out on a crucial market share.
Closest I know of is the nom-nom thread: https://forums.bf2s.com/viewtopic.php?id=111807
Dilbert_X
The X stands for
+1,725|4960|eXtreme to the maX
Apparently aged eggs are best for hardboiling.
#FreeBritney
Dilbert_X
The X stands for
+1,725|4960|eXtreme to the maX

SuperJail Warden wrote:

Called a Professor to clarify due dates for an online graduate class. The guy doesn't like email for some reason and wants to be called. I said "Good afternoon Mr. Name". And he corrected me "Dr. Name".
A friend of mine insists on checking into motels using 'Dr.', and everything else.
Its stupid really, since he wouldn't want to be woken up at 3am to deal with a heart attack when his PhD was in nuclear fuel testing.
#FreeBritney
uziq
Member
+388|2307
errr it's totally normal for academics to use 'dr.' as their formal address. the academic doctorate is centuries old. it's not exactly an affectation.

you'd have to be a rube or hayseed to think that everyone who is a 'dr' is a medical practitioner.
Dilbert_X
The X stands for
+1,725|4960|eXtreme to the maX
Except he's not an academic.
#FreeBritney
uziq
Member
+388|2307
he had a doctorate - he’s a doctor.

tenured career academics tend to earn the prof. prefix. or even prof. dr.
SuperJail Warden
Gone Forever
+445|2574
At the very least he shouldn't get offended when people refer to him as Mr. instead of Dr.
unnamednewbie13
Moderator
+1,881|5626|USA

When people go through the trouble of earning it, they deserve to be addressed by it. Correcting someone over the phone about it seems like a snobby flex though, irritating even. But resenting or mocking a non-MD doctor for *checks notes* being a doctor who isn't a doctor of medicine is asinine. re: dr jill biden title "controversy"

Mentioned before, but some people aren't comfortable with being addressed as doctor even formally.
KEN-JENNINGS
I am all that is MOD!
+2,905|5487|949

I forgot my hard boiled eggs today >.<
Larssen
Member
+60|742
Title snobs get an instant middle finger from me. Of course in official correspondence you refer to people by proper title but in more familiar setting 'you' suffices. Though I have to add that you have more formal variants of 'you' in different languages. Sie for german, U for dutch & flemish, vous for french etc. Depending on the setting, and usually professionally, that's the go-to.

Thinking about it, formality is much better expressed in languages other than english.

Last edited by Larssen (2021-02-23 10:23:43)

uziq
Member
+388|2307
actually ‘you’ was the formal version in english, equivalent to vous. our informal singular second person was ‘thou’. we just got rid of the informal one over time. so if anything we are more formal

but seriously it’s a commonplace of linguistics that the english language is the most amalgamated of all european languages. that’s why our representative is shakespeare, with his demotic speech, puns and sex jokes, and the french elevate figures like racine, with extremely purified lexicon and hang ups over even mentioning nouns like ‘handkerchiefs’ on stage for fear of spoiling the language.

english has a formal register but it’s just swamped out bg about 100 others. the vocabulary and level of synonyms in english is simply not comparable to a more formalised latinate language like french. in english there’s 100 synonyms for everything and 5 ways to construct the same sentence. french is much more linear.
Dilbert_X
The X stands for
+1,725|4960|eXtreme to the maX
I love synonyms, one of my german counterparts admitted he found english hard because its good style to use synonyms but he could never tell if the intention was the same meaning or something subtly different.

Obviously from then on it was open season on synonyms.

My greatest achievement remains working "I hope we can achieve the final solution to this problem" into an email.
#FreeBritney
uziq
Member
+388|2307
it's also a commonplace in translation studies that you shouldn't repeat a word where a synonym is available when dealing with english, that is, it's 'good form' to provide a variety and to avoid repetition, which is difficult to grasp in french or german where the same adjective or phrase will be re-used without second thought.

paradoxically some of the most sublime english-language poets managed to include repetition without it ringing that dead note that most english speakers usually avoid when they seek synonyms or variation. yeats, for one, was devastatingly good at simply repeating the same words and keeping it fresh sounding.
Dilbert_X
The X stands for
+1,725|4960|eXtreme to the maX
The Malaysian woman at work is being tedious and obstructive, I am going to need to learn more latin phrases to work in.
#FreeBritney
Dilbert_X
The X stands for
+1,725|4960|eXtreme to the maX
I can see the point of formal and informal, the whole gender business is largely stupid.

On the subject of language my Australia friends were blown away that in the UK you can tell where someone is from pretty well to the town, which class they were in, which branch of the armed services etc. from accent.
#FreeBritney
uziq
Member
+388|2307
that also applies to regions of america, too, although yes in the UK voice/accent is additionally stratified by class/education/background.

genders in languages i always found a massive pain, i mean it's the height of arbitrariness. what makes one object female and another male? aaargh!

i'm not anywhere near polyglot or comfortable in multiple languages, but one funny aspect of my current job is that i'm so used to dealing with foreign language authors writing in garbled english that i can identify language-specific grammatical errors. germans writing in english, italians writing in english, chinese writing in english, etc, all have highly specific translation/second language grammar blindspots. i could probably tell you where an author was from by his/her english mistakes.
Dilbert_X
The X stands for
+1,725|4960|eXtreme to the maX
My sister studied german and groans whenever I call Cat-Astrophe "Der Katze", since he's a male cat.

I was OK at French, mediocre at German, only dabbled in Russian for fun and to humour the Russian teacher.
#FreeBritney
Larssen
Member
+60|742

uziq wrote:

it's also a commonplace in translation studies that you shouldn't repeat a word where a synonym is available when dealing with english, that is, it's 'good form' to provide a variety and to avoid repetition, which is difficult to grasp in french or german where the same adjective or phrase will be re-used without second thought.
Depends. It's not so that all words have singular purpose, but there's always a context. In writing I think it's generally good to be a little creative and avoid ad naseum repeats of the same terms. This goes for most languages, unless there's a contextually specific meaning you have to convey. French is more rigid though in that respect, but still some room for playfulness.
uziq
Member
+388|2307
french is incredibly repetitious. it's 'le mot juste' over and above the urge to say the same thing in 10 different ways.

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