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-101-InvaderZim
Member
+42|6022|Waikato, Aotearoa
On this day (April 25 1915), Australian, New Zealand and English soldiers landed on the battlefield of
Gallipoli in Turkey. Their hope was to capture the Dardenelles by surprise, and force Turkey out of WW1.
Unfortunately it didnt happen. Some months earlier a British destroyer was spotted doing a reconnaissance
of the Dardenelles by Turkish forces and in doing so, gave up the element of surprise. And so began 9 months
of a stalemate between Turkish forces and Commonwealth forces.
The Commonwealth abandoned Gallipoli on the 19 Dec 1915 in defeat. The Gallipoli Campaign has since become
a day of Remembrance for New Zealand and Australian soldiers that have fallen battle for all Wars since, as well as a "Founding Myth" for both countries.

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn
At the going down of the sun and in the morning
We will remember them.

LEST WE FORGET THEIR SACRIFICE AND COURAGE
joker3327
=IBF2=
+305|5776|Cheshire. UK
Significance of Anzac Day

On 25 April 1915, eight months into the First World War, Allied soldiers landed on the shores of the Gallipoli peninsula. This was Turkish territory that formed part of Germany's ally, the Ottoman Empire. The troops were there as part of a plan to open the Dardanelles Strait to the Allied fleets, allowing them to threaten the Ottoman capital Constantinople (now Istanbul) and, it was hoped, force a Turkish surrender. The Allied forces encountered unexpectedly strong resistance from the Turks, and both sides suffered enormous loss of life.

The forces from New Zealand and Australia, fighting as part of the ANZAC (Australian and New Zealand Army Corps), played an important part in the Gallipoli campaign. At its beginning, people at home greeted with excitement the news that our soldiers were at last fully engaged in the war. New Zealand soldiers distinguished themselves with their courage and skill, establishing an enduring bond with the Australians they fought alongside.

The Gallipoli campaign was, however, a costly failure for the Allies, who after nine months abandoned it and evacuated their surviving troops. Almost a third of the New Zealanders taking part had been killed; the communities they came from had counted the cost in the lengthy casualty lists that appeared in their newspapers. And the sacrifice seemed to have been in vain, for the under-resourced and poorly-conducted campaign did not have any significant influence on the outcome of the war.

Although Anzac Day, the anniversary of the first day of conflict, does not mark a military triumph, it does remind us of a very important episode in New Zealand's history. Great suffering was caused to a small country by the loss of so many of its young men. But the Gallipoli campaign showcased attitudes and attributes - bravery, tenacity, practicality, ingenuity, loyalty to King and comrades - that helped New Zealand define itself as a nation, even as it fought unquestioningly on the other side of the world in the name of the British Empire.

After Gallipoli, New Zealand had a greater confidence in its distinct identity, and a greater pride in the international contribution it could make. And the mutual respect earned during the fighting formed the basis of the close ties with Australia that continue today.
Ottomania
Troll has returned.
+62|5699|Istanbul-Turkey
shame on britons that said we turks are barbarians and persuaded lots of australians to join war...

Last edited by Ottomania (2007-04-24 06:24:31)

Bubbalo
The Lizzard
+541|5740
Attaturk would probably burn you alive.
Ottomania
Troll has returned.
+62|5699|Istanbul-Turkey
for what?
=OBS= EstebanRey
Member
+256|5729|Oxford, England, UK, EU, Earth

Ottomania wrote:

shame on britons that said we turks are barbarians and persuaded lots of australians to join war...
You do know that the French were also responsible don't you?  Also, that win for Turkey inspired the war of independence which saw it become an independant nation, away from the Ottoman Empire.  I know it's not why we started it, but it was the result.

As for Turks being barbarians, well I certainly wouldn't want to be an oppsing fan at a Galatasary match!!!!
BVC
Member
+325|5874
Lest we forget
Ottomania
Troll has returned.
+62|5699|Istanbul-Turkey

=OBS= EstebanRey wrote:

Ottomania wrote:

shame on britons that said we turks are barbarians and persuaded lots of australians to join war...
You do know that the French were also responsible don't you?  Also, that win for Turkey inspired the war of independence which saw it become an independant nation, away from the Ottoman Empire.  I know it's not why we started it, but it was the result.

As for Turks being barbarians, well I certainly wouldn't want to be an oppsing fan at a Galatasary match!!!!
of course frenchs are responsible too, but not at australia. you said that we win the war but that was a very expensive win. we lost nearly whole educated people, this caused our nation stayed immigrant for years.
<BoTM>J_Aero
Qualified Expert
+62|5643|Melbourne - Home of Football
Lest We Forget...
Flecco
iPod is broken.
+1,048|5843|NT, like Mick Dundee

I'm fortunate enough to be going on a school trip to the Western Front, Normandy and a few other spots in France/Belgium/London in June. Tomorrow I'm going to both the services that are held in my town. These men might not have fought to protect their loved ones, but they forged our two nation's identities and have left a legacy for all Australians and New Zealanders to be proud of. Honour, courage, loyalty and raw strength of character were all demonstrated. The Somme, Ypres and Gallipolli... May we never forget the thousands of our sons who helped forge these two great nations into what they are today.

"They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn
At the going down of the sun and in the morning
We will remember them.

Lest we forget."

Last edited by Flecco (2007-04-24 09:29:21)

Whoa... Can't believe these forums are still kicking.
Invaderzim
Chicken wing?
+49|5627|Newcastle NSW Australia
Lest we forget
jimbo1000
Member
+4|5422|Sydney
lest we forget
weasel_thingo
Member
+74|5505
Lest we forget.

Damn English and their navigating to the wrong places.

Last edited by weasel_thingo (2007-04-24 19:09:40)

Superior Mind
(not macbeth)
+1,755|5871
Happy ANZAC day! The next time I drink I'll make a toast the the Aussies and Kiwis. (and the Brits...)

Last edited by Superior Mind (2007-04-24 18:58:57)

Ty
Mass Media Casualty
+2,398|5953|Noizyland

Flecco wrote:

I'm fortunate enough to be going on a school trip to the Western Front, Normandy and a few other spots in France/Belgium/London in June.
Your school seems to be copying my old school. Every two years a group sets off to do that. I was in the second group in 2004. We went to Turkey too, arriving in Instanbul at the same time as George Dubya, (which sucked, the city was so secure it looked like a ghost city. I'll be back there some day though.)
We were based in Çanakkale which is a really nice place and set out to the battlefields from there, ANZAC Cove, Lone Pine, Chunuk Bair. Our group of fourty did a Haka near the big monument on top of Chunuk Bair which scared the other people there.

The whole Turkish campaign was a huge fuckup by the British. Not only did they cause Turkey to become enemies in the first place by refusing to give them the Battleships they bought, (Germany noticed this so sent two Battleships as a gift with the proposal to join forces,) and Churchill's whole strategy was bloody stupid, the commanders were idiots by sending wave after wave of ANZAC troops, (also Irish were a big group to suffer further down the penninsular,) into waiting gunfire. It's a sure sign of insanity to try the same thing repeatdly when it dosn' work th first time, yet somehow the commanders thought the Turks would run out of bullets?
Idiocy.
The one successful move of the whole campaign was the retreat, in which thee were NO ANZAC CAUALTIES. The troops put a series of mechanism to fire discarded rifles at odd intervals to make the Turkish troops think that they were still there. Eventually when the Turks did venture down to the former ANZAC bases, (avoiding the booby traps which in my opinion were incredibly mean-spirited,) they actuall found gifts and lettes expressing their respect for the victors.

That's the weirdest thing righ there. During the whole Gallipoi campaign there are numerous occurences of the soldiers exchanging gifts and notes and singing songs together. The mutual respect the sides had is just so strange, but I guess warfare itself is pretty alien. My favourite story is of the exchange of food. Turkish troops threw bread and other food to the ANZACs and the ANZACs threw their rations of bully beef, (kind of like spam,) to the Turks. After trying it the Turks threw it back.
[Blinking eyes thing]
Steam: http://steamcommunity.com/id/tzyon
ozzie_johnson
Member
+98|5836|Penrith, N.S.W, Australia
lest we forget.
RavyGravy
Son.
+617|5584|NSW, Australia

lest we forget
KuSTaV
noice
+947|5690|Gold Coast
I just came back from an ANZAC service, had to stand at ease for quite a while. Its such a relief to sit down and rest my feet. It was pretty hot, but we got water. Some person fainted because we were standing for so long, but it was good nonetheless. Some old fella fell down too, but it was because he was in direct sun. Dawn services are better, as its not as hot.
noice                                                                                                        https://static.bf2s.com/files/user/26774/awsmsanta.png
bajabug69
Member
+2|5712|Oz
Lest we forget
KuSTaV
noice
+947|5690|Gold Coast

Ty wrote:

That's the weirdest thing righ there. During the whole Gallipoi campaign there are numerous occurences of the soldiers exchanging gifts and notes and singing songs together. The mutual respect the sides had is just so strange, but I guess warfare itself is pretty alien. My favourite story is of the exchange of food. Turkish troops threw bread and other food to the ANZACs and the ANZACs threw their rations of bully beef, (kind of like spam,) to the Turks. After trying it the Turks threw it back.
Yea, thats really strange. Ive heard of that, but its kinda odd to do that, and it would be a bit awkward, shooting someone you just had a good time with...
noice                                                                                                        https://static.bf2s.com/files/user/26774/awsmsanta.png
_raab
Member
+28|5412|Western Aust.
lest we forget
BN
smells like wee wee
+159|5946
I just finished watching the Melbourne march and the dawn service. I thought Brendan Nelson spoke very well and made some terrific quotes in the dawn service.

Lest we forget
Fred[OZ75]
Jihad Jeep Driver
+19|5938|Perth, Western Australia
Gallipoli is neither a victory or the largest campaign fought by Australians in WW1, there where more Anzac's lost in one days fighting at Pozieres than the entire Gallipoli campaign, yet it is the first which Australian and New Zealand forces fought under their own countries flag. The bloody birth of both countries.

Lest We Forget

Last edited by Fred[OZ75] (2007-04-25 13:55:07)

Fenris_GreyClaw
Real Хорошо
+826|5698|Adelaide, South Australia

Lest we forget.
{A.K.A}LordBeefman
Member
+32|5779|Sydney, Australia
Lest We Forget

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