Announcement

kiteboarderni
Member
+62|6013
http://youtube.com/watch?v=YLeL8XFBB_0

seen this vid and im wondering if this can be done at home. if so how? thanks
pedigreeuk
I'm English, not British!
+113|6104|Rotherham, England
Pure water (as pure as possible)

Clean bottle (very clean)

Cold temperatures, freezer may work but will more than likely disturb liquid getting it out, so outside will probably be better (assuming it's still cold enough)

Patience

Put pure water in clean bottle, leave somewhere cold, wait for liquid to match air-temperature gently pick up and shake.

Video results



Edit: also works the other way - superboiling (tends to make things explode though )

Last edited by pedigreeuk (2007-03-19 06:29:14)

weasel_thingo
Member
+74|5660
do it with a glass bottle and make it full with no air bubbles
.:XDR:.PureFodder
Member
+105|6162

pedigreeuk wrote:

Pure water (as pure as possible)

Clean bottle (very clean)

Cold temperatures, freezer may work but will more than likely disturb liquid getting it out, so outside will probably be better (assuming it's still cold enough)

Patience

Put pure water in clean bottle, leave somewhere cold, wait for liquid to match air-temperature gently pick up and shake.

Video results



Edit: also works the other way - superboiling (tends to make things explode though )
Yeah, that one is dangerous. Take some pure water, put it in a mug and microwave it. Add a spoon to the mug any you'll get a face full of superheated water.
Nasty.

On an odd side note. Did you know that if you place a cup of cold water and a cup of warm water in a freezer, the warm one will freeze first?
UON
Junglist Massive
+223|5986
Looks fake.
ghettoperson
Member
+1,943|5982

Looks odd I'll give you that. No idea whether it's possible or not, but it doesn't sound it. I know nothing of it though.
UON
Junglist Massive
+223|5986

ghettoperson wrote:

Looks odd I'll give you that. No idea whether it's possible or not, but it doesn't sound it. I know nothing of it though.
It is theoretically possible, but the vid looks more like when you add water to ouzo to me.
CommieChipmunk
Member
+488|5903|Portland, OR, USA
TheEternalPessimist
Wibble
+412|5953|Mhz

Supercooling is possible and not actually all that hard. Pedigree was basically spot on wit the "how to" bit, you just need to get pure water to about 10* below freezing point without distubing it at all, freezers vibrate so much it ususaly just crystalizes straight off so you need to find a way to do it without the water moving at all.

EDIT: Looks like its winter in the video, thus bloody cold, I'd guess he left the bottle out for the night then took it into his car for the video.

Last edited by TheEternalPessimist (2007-03-19 18:08:29)

pedigreeuk
I'm English, not British!
+113|6104|Rotherham, England

UON wrote:

Looks fake.
nope get the right water viscosity and temp and it's possible
ATG
Banned
+5,233|5862|Global Command

.:XDR:.PureFodder wrote:

pedigreeuk wrote:

Pure water (as pure as possible)

Clean bottle (very clean)

Cold temperatures, freezer may work but will more than likely disturb liquid getting it out, so outside will probably be better (assuming it's still cold enough)

Patience

Put pure water in clean bottle, leave somewhere cold, wait for liquid to match air-temperature gently pick up and shake.

Video results



Edit: also works the other way - superboiling (tends to make things explode though )
Yeah, that one is dangerous. Take some pure water, put it in a mug and microwave it. Add a spoon to the mug any you'll get a face full of superheated water.
Nasty.

On an odd side note. Did you know that if you place a cup of cold water and a cup of warm water in a freezer, the warm one will freeze first?
No way. freezing is all about temperature. A cold glass will freeze before a warm glass.
Fen321
Member
+54|5831|Singularity
This question[does hot water freeze before cold water], first raised in 1969 by a Tanzanian student named Erasto Mpemba is still a topic for controversy today. When a container of water is placed in a freezer, there are many factors which can affect the length of time it will take to freeze, and under the proper combination of circumstances, a given volume of hot water in a container may freeze faster than the same volume of cold water.

Some factors which can contribute to this phenomenon are:

    * Evaporation:
      Hot water is more likely to evaporate from a container than cold water, leaving a reduced volume of water in the container. Less water takes less time to freeze. Also, the evaporating water it pulls heat from the water remaining in the container, reducing its temperature and thus its freezing time.

    * Conduction:
      When a container of hot water is placed on an icy surface in a freezer, the hot container will melt the ice on the surface. The melted freezer ice will provide better thermal contact with the hot container, allowing better conduction of heat from the hot container than from the cold container placed in the same environment.

    * Convection:
      Water is most dense at 4C. When a container of uniformly cold water freezes, it generally forms a skin of ice, which is less dense, on the surface. This skin insulates the remaining volume of water, impeding heat loss. In the container of hot water, as the surface water cools to 4C, it is more dense than the hot water below, and sinks, forcing more hot water to the surface to be cooled. This sets up convection currents which can cause the container of hot water to lose heat more rapidly than the container of cold water.

    * Impurities:
      Water usually contains impurities such as dissolved gases, dust particles, etc. These impurities can lower the freezing temperature of the water, and also provide nucleation points which cause ice crystals to form. Some of these impurities are driven out when water is heated. The purer hot water may actually have a higher freezing temperature than the cold water, and it may also be subject to supercooling. When this occurs, the entire volume of water remains liquid below its freezing point, then the entire volume freezes solid rapidly. The cold water may tend to form ice crystals on the impurities, insulating the remaining water in the container, and there may ultimately be some liquid water in the container when the formerly hot container has frozen solid.

It is important to remember that in an experiment such as this, a great many factors come into play, many of them quite subtle, and initial conditions are crucial in determining the outcome.


IT CAN BE DONE!

Last edited by Fen321 (2007-03-19 18:20:09)

UON
Junglist Massive
+223|5986

pedigreeuk wrote:

UON wrote:

Looks fake.
nope get the right water viscosity and temp and it's possible
It was just the second to last one that looked a bit like something had been added to the liquid to me... I can concede it is real, but it still looks a bit fake.  Anyway, I enjoy being a skeptic about everything, stop raining on my parade
Varegg
Support fanatic :-)
+2,206|6143|NÃ¥rvei

ATG wrote:

.:XDR:.PureFodder wrote:

pedigreeuk wrote:

Pure water (as pure as possible)

Clean bottle (very clean)

Cold temperatures, freezer may work but will more than likely disturb liquid getting it out, so outside will probably be better (assuming it's still cold enough)

Patience

Put pure water in clean bottle, leave somewhere cold, wait for liquid to match air-temperature gently pick up and shake.

Video results



Edit: also works the other way - superboiling (tends to make things explode though )
Yeah, that one is dangerous. Take some pure water, put it in a mug and microwave it. Add a spoon to the mug any you'll get a face full of superheated water.
Nasty.

On an odd side note. Did you know that if you place a cup of cold water and a cup of warm water in a freezer, the warm one will freeze first?
No way. freezing is all about temperature. A cold glass will freeze before a warm glass.
But then again warm water freeze before cold water !
Wait behind the line ..............................................................
Scardaddy
Member
+37|5725|UK
Pure water like what, could I boil the water to get the required pureness or would I have to find a different way to purify the water?  Also obviously a clean container is very necessary, I.E. cleaned with purified water and he's used a plastic one, so I'm guessing that, that would work.  Lastly this is a question of allowing the water to then match the air temperature, so did he open the lid a little bit?

Maybe I'm dumb but wow that is a serious reaction taking place and the power required to create an instant reaction like that must be massize.
mcminty
Moderating your content for the Australian Govt.
+879|6054|Sydney, Australia

Scardaddy wrote:

Pure water like what, could I boil the water to get the required pureness or would I have to find a different way to purify the water?  Also obviously a clean container is very necessary, I.E. cleaned with purified water and he's used a plastic one, so I'm guessing that, that would work.  Lastly this is a question of allowing the water to then match the air temperature, so did he open the lid a little bit?

Maybe I'm dumb but wow that is a serious reaction taking place and the power required to create an instant reaction like that must be massize.
I guess pure water would have to be distilled water.


You can never have "pure water", some of it self-ionises.

H2O + H2O ---> H3O+ + OH-



Mcminty.
.:XDR:.PureFodder
Member
+105|6162

mcminty wrote:

Scardaddy wrote:

Pure water like what, could I boil the water to get the required pureness or would I have to find a different way to purify the water?  Also obviously a clean container is very necessary, I.E. cleaned with purified water and he's used a plastic one, so I'm guessing that, that would work.  Lastly this is a question of allowing the water to then match the air temperature, so did he open the lid a little bit?

Maybe I'm dumb but wow that is a serious reaction taking place and the power required to create an instant reaction like that must be massize.
I guess pure water would have to be distilled water.


You can never have "pure water", some of it self-ionises.

H2O + H2O ---> H3O+ + OH-



Mcminty.
But you can remove the other ions that will normally be found in water and degass it too as tiny gas bubbles can nucleate the crystallisation.

The reason that the crysatallisation happens so fast is that below zero degrees celcius, the thermodynamically favourable form is ice, but there is a kinetic barrier to the water forming an ordered crystalline structure. Usually there are other ions, bits of dirt and dust, air bubbles etc. in water that will have oriented the water molecules already, hence removing the kinetic barrier to crystallisation an the crystal will nucleate off that. If you can remove the crap that's in the water, the kinetic barrier holds and water that is below zero stays as water. Hitting it could be doing a number of things to cause it to nucleate. deforming the bottles surface may cause it, possibly the impact is creating air bubbles that will nucleate the ice. It's possible that the shockwave itself from hitting the surface is causing the nucleation. Either way, once a nucleus has formed, the water can readily cyrstallise against the surface of the growing ice crystal, thereby getting itself into the thermodynamically favoured state.
Scardaddy
Member
+37|5725|UK
.:XDR:.PureFodder

Now that my friend is an expert response +1

Board footer

Privacy Policy - © 2022 Jeff Minard