unnamednewbie13
Moderator
+1,998|6197|USA

There was never a blue lives matter to relapse too. It was more for uzique's benefit picking up from your trolling. I think I've made myself plenty clear on the blue lives stuff for enough years. Seems to have now cemented in your mind too, so there should be no question.

I think police should be paid well. But the catch is I also think there needs to be a fundamental change in their obligations and responsibilities, training, and culture, with support from social workers and a strengthened social safety net. Nothing as simple as merely "pay/fund cops better and you'll get better police." That is not the case.

That one desk cop really lit a fire under your ass, didn't she.
uziq
Member
+476|2877
SuperJail Warden
Gone Forever
+591|3144
I saw that. The video of the school at night is eerie. Ugly white conservatives having a fashion show while a town of mourns is something.
https://i.imgur.com/xsoGn9X.jpg
unnamednewbie13
Moderator
+1,998|6197|USA

Moment of irony. Police, who aren't cooperating with the investigation, threaten mother they handcuffed, who ran into the school to rescue her kids, with "obstruction" of justice if she continues talking to the press.

A Uvalde Mom Who Ran Into The School To Save Her Sons From The Shooting Spoke Out About How Police Tried To Stop Her
Angeli Gomez told CBS News that she received a call from law enforcement suggesting that she could face consequences for speaking to media outlets about her experience.
https://www.buzzfeednews.com/article/st … ing-police

CBS News also reported that Gomez, who is reportedly on probation for previous charges against her, claimed that she had received a call from “someone in law enforcement” telling her that if she kept talking to the media and sharing her story she might face some kind of violation for obstruction of justice.
Side note, looks like the media is done censoring her kids' faces now. Maybe they got permission. If so, nice that they waited at least.

I've also seen people on the internet criticize her for not rescuing more kids, so I guess that's a thing.
unnamednewbie13
Moderator
+1,998|6197|USA

SuperJail Warden wrote:

I saw that. The video of the school at night is eerie. Ugly white conservatives having a fashion show while a town of mourns is something.
Their benefits concert was canceled. Like all but one of the musicians pulled out, I think. It'll be interesting to see if there's a fan backlash against the country singers who didn't "stand their ground."

The poorly-timed NRA convention was still like 280 miles out. That's the driving distance between Portland, OR and Canada. Some people are citing proximity as a reason it's in bad taste, but Texas is a big state. Spend all day on the road and it's "oops, all texas!"

I post this well within knowledge of the risk that you will spend the next several pages in multiple threads obsessively calling me an NRA sympathizer. I don't support the NRA, just so long as we're refreshed on that.
uziq
Member
+476|2877
does it matter where the conference was, geographically? i think it's in poor taste to have your big politicized gun rally the day after a horrendous mass shooting, personally. they could have hosted that shit in maine and it would still have been gross.
Dilbert_X
The X stands for
+1,786|5531|eXtreme to the maX
Pretty hard to schedule these things, and all the attendees, though.
And its a certainty there'll be a mass-shooting in the weeks leading up to it whenever it is.

Nevertheless the NRA jumped the shark decades ago. They've sealed their own doom and that of their sponsors.
Sensible measures put through by agreement would have let 99% of their members carry on buying all the guns they could possibly have wanted and put a big crimp on mass shootings.
Русский военный корабль, иди на хуй!
uziq
Member
+476|2877

Dilbert_X wrote:

Pretty hard to schedule these things, and all the attendees, though.
And its a certainty there'll be a mass-shooting in the weeks leading up to it whenever it is.
of course, it would have caused inconvenience and quite some cost. but this is a giant and very, very powerful organisation.

20 dead kids and a gutted town isn't worth rescheduling? /shrug
Dilbert_X
The X stands for
+1,786|5531|eXtreme to the maX
Pretty much a weekly event in America.

It would have cost millions to reschedule and the NRA is bankrupt.
Русский военный корабль, иди на хуй!
unnamednewbie13
Moderator
+1,998|6197|USA

uziq wrote:

does it matter where the conference was, geographically? i think it's in poor taste to have your big politicized gun rally the day after a horrendous mass shooting, personally. they could have hosted that shit in maine and it would still have been gross.
Some people think it does. I don't.

As for timing, pick a day out of the year and there's a decent chance there will be some horrendous mass shooting, somewhere in the US, and IMO a gun convention coincidentally during or the days after will never be a good look for gun advocacy.
SuperJail Warden
Gone Forever
+591|3144
Maybe they just shouldn't have a NRA convention. The NRA messed up my damn Youtube recommendations.
https://i.imgur.com/SbD00FJ.png
https://i.imgur.com/xsoGn9X.jpg
unnamednewbie13
Moderator
+1,998|6197|USA

bruh

Firm proposes Taser-armed drones to stop school shootings
https://storage.googleapis.com/afs-prod/media/09aa1277fbea4efdad4d210e30030dc1/1000.jpeg

ap: https://apnews.com/article/technology-p … c189106f65
eff: https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2022/06/a … nes-tasers

Mission creep is very real. Time and time again, technologies given to police to use only in the most extreme circumstances make their way onto streets during protests or to respond to petty crime. For example, cell site simulators (often called “Stingrays”) were developed for use in foreign battlefields, brought home in the name of fighting “terrorism,” then used by law enforcement to catch immigrants and a man who stole $57 worth of food. Likewise, police have targeted BLM protesters with face surveillance and Amazon Ring doorbell cameras.
We are descending into a half-life 2 reality. Next they'll remove the propeller guards so that the drone can attack people with its spinblades.

https://img1.wikia.nocookie.net/__cb20090527003317/half-life/en/images/4/4b/Manhack.jpg

Better pick up that can, junior.
SuperJail Warden
Gone Forever
+591|3144
More parents would want drones in school than mental health centers.
A Mental Health Clinic in School? No, Thanks, Says the School Board

American teenagers are reporting severe levels of anxiety and depression. But when Connecticut moved to expand mental health services in schools, it ran into fierce opposition in one town.
https://static01.nyt.com/images/2022/06/02/science/00KILLINGLY1/00KILLINGLY1-mobileMasterAt3x.jpg?quality=75&auto=webp&disable=upscale&width=1200
"Jasmine Berti, a resident of Killingly, Conn., demonstrated outside the town hall before a Board of Education meeting last month to discuss expanding the high school’s mental health services."

No Jasmine, all lives matter.
One evening in March, a high school senior named Sydney Zicolella stood before the school board in this rural, blue-collar Connecticut town and described her psychiatric history, beginning in the sixth grade, when she was “by definition, clinically depressed.”

Ms. Zicolella, 17, who wore her dark, curly hair pulled back, is the third of four children in a devout Christian family, and the editor of the newspaper at Killingly High School.

Many students there were struggling, she told the board. She had seen kids “walked, carried and cradled out of counseling, hysterical, not wanting to go to the hospital, but also not wanting to be sad anymore.”

Convincing the board was a long shot, she knew that. Her own mother, Lisa, 49, who, by her own account, grew up in “the generation of toughing things out,” didn’t support the clinic.

It wasn’t that Lisa entirely disapproved of therapy — when Sydney was in crisis, she scoured northeastern Connecticut in search of a therapist who would take her insurance — but she feared school-based therapists would end up advising teens on matters like gender identity or birth control, which she felt belonged firmly in the grip of parents.

“I do personally believe there’s a lot of agendas out there,” Lisa said. “And children are very malleable.”

This debate has divided Killingly, and its families, since January, when Robert J. Angeli, the superintendent of schools, presented a plan to open a state-funded mental health clinic in the high school.

It was not uncommon, she said, for friends to “disappear for months, only to find out that they had been at a mental health hospital right down the road to my house.” She urged the board to approve the placement of a mental health clinic in the school, part of a push by the state of Connecticut to dramatically expand access to care for teenagers.

Legislation to expand Connecticut’s network of school-based clinics had sailed through the legislature, passing the House by a vote of 143 to 4. When Mr. Angeli presented the plan before the town’s Board of Education, though, it ran into a solid wall of resistance, mostly on the grounds that it infringed on the rights of parents.

In March, Killingly’s board members rejected the plan by a vote of 6 to 3. After that, dozens of supporters of the clinic filed a complaint with Connecticut’s Board of Education, asking the state to “investigate and take corrective action.”


Since then, Killingly’s school board meetings have become a battleground for competing views on mental health, exposing divisions that are both partisan and generational. Teenagers have picketed on the well-manicured town common, where petunias grow around a memorial to the Civil War dead, with signs reading “14.7 PERCENT HAVE MADE A SUICIDE PLAN” and “TALK TO YOUR CHILDREN ABOUT MENTAL HEALTH.”

Standoffs like the one in Killingly are being watched apprehensively by mental health advocates. During the pandemic, the mental health of children shot to the top of the agenda for both political parties. School-based services, which studies suggest can significantly decrease suicidal behavior and substance abuse, have emerged as a first-line policy response.

Over the last year, legislators in more than 30 states have considered an expansion of school-based services, according to Inseparable, a mental health policy group, and eight states, including Connecticut, have passed legislation to do so. Before the services reach students, though, they must be embraced by American communities.

In Connecticut, which already has more than 100 school-based health clinics, Killingly is an outlier. But lawmakers and conservative activists have targeted mental health curriculum in several states, often taking aim at social and emotional learning programs, known as SEL, which train students to manage emotions and practice conflict resolution. Lawmakers in Indiana and Oklahoma have put forward bills that would limit the use of SEL in the classroom.

On the January evening when the superintendent introduced staff from Generations Family Health Center, the nonprofit health care group that was to provide services in the school, the visitors peered out of Zoom screens with cheery smiles.

The plan was for licensed therapists from Generations to work in a space on the school’s third floor. Students could be referred by teachers or family members, or could come in themselves, and therapy sessions would be scheduled during school hours. Therapists would bill insurance based on a sliding fee scale, using federal funds if necessary, so there would be no cost to the school and little, if any, to the families.

Then a chill entered the room as the board members began peppering them with questions. The visitors’ smiles faded.

Would they advise students on birth control or abortion? (They wouldn’t give medical advice, but might discuss if it comes up.) If children were referred and didn’t want therapy, would they be forced to do it? (No.) Would students be seen by peers going into treatment, exposing them to ridicule and stigma? (Hopefully not.) Could they get therapy without their parents knowing about it?

Conceivably, yes, was the answer. By law, clinicians in Connecticut can provide six sessions of mental health treatment to minors without parental consent under a narrow set of circumstances — if the minor sought treatment, it was deemed clinically necessary and if requiring parental notification would deter the minor from receiving it.

This provision is used rarely; in the nearby town of Putnam, which has hosted a school-based mental health clinic for nine years, treating hundreds of students, no child has ever been treated without parental permission, said Michael Morrill, a Putnam school board member.

But it was a major sticking point for Norm Ferron, one of the Killingly board members, who said the arrangement would “give a student a lot more access to counseling without seeking parental approval, and I’m not real keen on that.”

Another board member, Jason Muscara, said he had already heard enough to make his mind up.

“I am not going to make it easier for kids to go around their parents,” he said. “I don’t think we should be helping a kid to walk into a mental health facility in a school and say, ‘I’m thinking about an abortion, let’s talk about that,’ without the parents knowing, for up to six visits.”

Killingly’s school board, swept up in the culture wars of the Trump era, has repeatedly cast itself as a bulwark against liberalism and government intrusion. Several of its members were elected in 2020, amid popular outrage over a decision to retire the school’s mascot, the Redmen, at the urging of a student group who said it was offensive. After the election, the new board voted 5 to 4 to reinstate the mascot.

The proposed mental health clinic has reopened those divisions, this time around psychotherapy and the values it might instill.

At one meeting, a school board member said that, years ago, a therapist had “meddled with my teenaged son’s mind, because at that age they are most vulnerable and they want someone to talk to.” A local man got up to say that “our modern-day psychology is rooted in occultism,” noting that Sigmund Freud used drugs while writing his thesis and Carl Jung channeled spirit guides.

Their wariness has resonated with some people in this community.

Gerry Golob, 33, a house painter, said his view of psychiatry was shaped when his mother was committed to a state mental hospital, where “they just drug people up.” Plenty of people in Killingly receive mental health treatment, he said — he called the town “a walking pharmaceutical clinic” — but he doesn’t want his children exposed to it. If a clinic were placed in the school, he said, “I would remove my kids instantly.”

The vehemence of the opposition to the clinic has come as a shock to Chris Viens, 49, one of three board members who has supported the idea. He said he expected “a little bit of pushback” but “really wasn’t prepared for the idea that we were going to have this long, drawn-out experience.”

“It almost seems like there’s a fear that something about their belief system is under attack,” Mr. Viens said in an interview, adding that he was offering his views as a citizen, rather than a board member. “They seem to think that they have to stop it here. It’s almost like this line you don’t cross.”

The superintendent, Mr. Angeli, and other members of the school board declined to comment for this article.

On the night in March when the Board of Education voted down the mental health center, Ms. Zicolella was at work, at a Mexican restaurant in Dayville.

A mother from the school came up to the cash register, told her about the vote and burst into tears.

“It was crazy, it made such an outpouring of emotion,” Ms. Zicolella said.

For Sydney and her close friends, mental health was a frank topic of discussion. Many of them had struggled after a series of deaths in the school community when they were seventh-graders, she said. In high school, she was diagnosed with depression and generalized anxiety disorder.

“Knowing what is going on in your head — being able to call it something official — helps you cope with those things,” she said. By the time they were seniors, her classmates were open about their diagnoses and treatments. “We do consider it part of our identity,” she said.

Jen Simpson, 28, said she listens to teenage customers who come in to her salon, BeautyHaus, and is startled by their sophisticated discussion of anxiety and trauma, a vocabulary she assumes they have picked up from social media.

Teenagers here have always coped with what she called “home life problems,” especially poverty and addiction, she said, but as recently as a decade ago, when she was in high school, mental health was a “taboo” subject.

“I get prom girls coming in for spray tans, and I’m just like, these are a whole different breed of person,” she said — knowledgeable, but also, sometimes, fragile. “The amount of people I see with marks from self-harming, it breaks my heart.”

A state working group listed public schools in Killingly among the 157 schools with the highest unmet needs in the state.

A 2021 survey of Killingly students conducted by the Southeastern Regional Action Council, a mental health policy group, found that 28.2 percent had thought about self-harm, and 14.7 percent reported making a plan for suicide. Though the response rate was low, at 42 percent, the results line up with findings from other communities, said Angela Rae Duhaime, the council’s associate director.

At moments, some board members have cast doubt on those findings. “How do you know they were honest responses? They were dealing with kids,” the board’s chairwoman, Janice Joly, said at a board meeting in March, in remarks that were later televised. In the outcry that followed, Ms. Joly resigned from the board.

Killingly, with a population of around 18,000, is a blue-collar, predominantly white former mill town, where, for decades, substance abuse and suicide were topics addressed by priests or pastors, if they were addressed at all. That approach has failed older generations, said Alyssah Yater, 17, another senior who has advocated in favor of the clinic.

“People like to say that kids these days are so sensitive, but I think the older generations struggled with mental illness but they didn’t get help,” she said. “I think that’s really dangerous. If you try to ignore it, or tell someone to shove it down, then one day, they’re just going to snap.”

At the school newspaper, Ms. Zicolella conducted a poll, and found that the clinic enjoyed nearly universal support. She was pleasantly surprised to see which students showed up at the protest on the issue, because they seemed to range across the political spectrum.

“In the beginning it was hard for us to talk about,” Ms. Zicolella said. “But once students heard about this problem, this mental health stigma being passed around in our town, we were like, hold on, why are we treating this like it’s taboo when it’s not?”

As the spring went on, the emotional tenor of the school board meetings seemed to ratchet up even higher, with a procession of students and parents signing up to make public appeals in favor of the clinic.

In late May, a local real estate agent, Judith Cournoyer, stepped up to the podium and carefully set down a black box. It contained the ashes of her son, who was diagnosed with schizoaffective disorder in early adulthood.

Her voice shaking, she described patients she saw while visiting him on locked wards — young people bearing scars from self-harm, emaciated, or “slithering on the floor.”

“I only came to tell my story in hopes that the Board of Education will listen,” she said. “I’m here to ask the powers that be, pay attention. There is an urgent need for mental health in the school.” One board member, a supporter of the clinic, wiped away tears.

With summer around the corner, the community was at a stalemate, with both sides waiting for the state to weigh in.

Advocates of the clinic have argued that Killingly’s needs are “especially extreme,” and that its board has persistently rejected additional services, imposing “its own extreme political views in a way that undermines the educational interest of the State.”

The board has responded, through its legal team, that the school already offers an array of resources for student mental health, and that communities cannot be forced to accept a school-based mental health clinic if they do not want one.

“By design, our education statutes have conferred on elected local officials the discretion to make such decisions,” the board’s response reads.

The state’s recommendation is expected in the coming weeks.

By then, Sydney Zicolella will have graduated, headed for a community college, and from there, she hopes, to a four-year degree and a career in journalism.

The March night she spoke at the school board, putting it all out there, had taught her a lot.

She could tell from the reaction of some of the school board members that nothing she had said that night had gotten through. Possibly, in the months since then, she had managed to open her mother’s mind a little; but her father hadn’t budged.

The experience, she said, has “definitely skewed my perspective on a lot of things having to do with adults and authority figures in my town.” Certainly it colored the way she sees Killingly. She brightened a little when she considered the future, when, as she put it, “teens my age turn into adults, and go into places of power in politics.”

“Things are going to look a lot different,” she said.
https://i.imgur.com/xsoGn9X.jpg
unnamednewbie13
Moderator
+1,998|6197|USA

Lot of stuff probably working against mental healthcare. Taboo subject, few but nutty people want their kid diagnosed with something, skepticism of diagnosis (not without reason: misdiagnosis, overdiagnosis, careless prescriptions). People like Mitch who think it's all fake news.

A bit of a bandaid for guns, maybe, not that I'm not for increasing access to all kinds of healthcare. There aren't always going to be warning signs, and it's not as if you can suspend every kid who is quiet and withdrawn.
SuperJail Warden
Gone Forever
+591|3144
I have one student who got hospitalized for saying stuff on the internet that made the police come and take him after school. The kid is back in school a week later. History is his favorite subject and he will ask a lot of questions about wars/death/military. The kid has severe ADHD. The other kids oftentimes bait and bully him too. Thank god our state has strong gun control laws because I would be worried if this kid had access to guns at home. Gun ownership rate in NJ is less than 15%.

https://worldpopulationreview.com/state … p-by-state

Very unlikely the kid will ever get his hands on a gun considering how hard we make it to purchase a gun.

In NJ you can't just apply for a license and go buy a gun. You have to provide non-family, non-work, non-lover references and the police who are the ones who process the permit also can go to your job and ask if you are crazy. Onerous requirements for a license but NJ has almost the lowest rate for gun violence in the country.

https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/pressroom/sosm … irearm.htm

What I am going to say is extremely controversial but gun control can work
https://i.imgur.com/xsoGn9X.jpg
unnamednewbie13
Moderator
+1,998|6197|USA

It would be interesting to compare state law between the worst and best. Can certainly be a factor, but maybe not the only one.
Dilbert_X
The X stands for
+1,786|5531|eXtreme to the maX

SuperJail Warden wrote:

I have one student who got hospitalized for saying stuff on the internet that made the police come and take him after school. The kid is back in school a week later. History is his favorite subject and he will ask a lot of questions about wars/death/military. The kid has severe ADHD. The other kids oftentimes bait and bully him too. Thank god our state has strong gun control laws because I would be worried if this kid had access to guns at home. Gun ownership rate in NJ is less than 15%.

https://worldpopulationreview.com/state … p-by-state

Very unlikely the kid will ever get his hands on a gun considering how hard we make it to purchase a gun.

In NJ you can't just apply for a license and go buy a gun. You have to provide non-family, non-work, non-lover references and the police who are the ones who process the permit also can go to your job and ask if you are crazy. Onerous requirements for a license but NJ has almost the lowest rate for gun violence in the country.

https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/pressroom/sosm … irearm.htm

What I am going to say is extremely controversial but gun control can work
Yes but its the per capita numbers which matter.

I bet the number of shootings per gun is a lot higher, thus proving that more guns are the answer by diluting the figures.
Русский военный корабль, иди на хуй!
SuperJail Warden
Gone Forever
+591|3144
In August, Annabell Guadalupe Rodriguez came home from her first day of fourth grade at Robb Elementary School and told her mom about a boy.

She said the boy, Xavier James Lopez, smelled and dressed "really nice," her mother recalled -- and within weeks, the two began passing notes in class. Months later, when the weather warmed, their families got together for weekend barbecues, where Annabell and Xavier would play tag.

Their mothers, Monica Gallegos and Felicha Martinez, soon discovered the children were texting each other "I love you" at bedtime. "Me and Felicha would laugh, like, 'How do y'all know about love?'" Gallegos told ABC News.

By spring, Annabell had a picture of Xavier strung around her neck, a gift from Martinez. She put it on for all of his little league games. Other times, she kept it safely in her backpack.
...
The two children will be buried this week at Hillcrest Cemetery in Uvalde, Texas. Martinez and Gallegos made the decision to have their 10-year-olds buried side by side.
Hmm. Well that is sad. Totally worth it for a guy to be able to shoot meat though.
https://i.imgur.com/xsoGn9X.jpg
unnamednewbie13
Moderator
+1,998|6197|USA

Isn't that depressing. Are they from that one classroom who had been all but the teacher exterminated?

I appreciate this kind of video more than the sanitized Hollywood version of gunshot wounds. The problem is the anticipatory glee you sometimes see in some of the content and comments. "That'll knock 'em flat!" "They ain't getting up again!" Diminishing of the serious business this all is.

From your video:
Ridonkulus S
12 days ago
What brought me here was an article that pretty much explained that the Uvalde children most likely look like the aftermath of that pork shoulder. They asked the parents for their DNA for matching. Let that sink in for a moment.
Were you referred to it by an article, or just from your regular perusal of gore porn?
SuperJail Warden
Gone Forever
+591|3144
I searched 'AR-15 v' in Youtube hoping to find a video of a (white) guy in the woods shooting guns to justify my preconceived notions. The meat murderer knocked it out of the park. From theme to thumbnail. Really excellent.
https://i.imgur.com/xsoGn9X.jpg
unnamednewbie13
Moderator
+1,998|6197|USA

I think there's a couple guys who go over gun safety every video, because it could be the first of theirs someone watches. I don't have any examples on hand. What are the statistic on gun youtubers becoming mass murderers, I wonder? I'd be more worried about a high school student stealing his uncle's gun and bringing it to show and blam if I was still in school.
SuperJail Warden
Gone Forever
+591|3144

unnamednewbie13 wrote:

What are the statistic on gun youtubers becoming mass murderers, I wonder?
oh sweet summer child



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eaton_Tow … s_shooting
https://i.imgur.com/xsoGn9X.jpg
unnamednewbie13
Moderator
+1,998|6197|USA

Was he a gun youtuber?
SuperJail Warden
Gone Forever
+591|3144
He made some YouTube videos showing off his guns.
https://i.imgur.com/xsoGn9X.jpg
unnamednewbie13
Moderator
+1,998|6197|USA

I haven't seen them so can't attest for his vibe there, but in general showing off your collection on an internet video is probably not as weird as family photos full of guns. He was also obsessed with a cartoon character, right? Didn't a lot of articles mention that? Was it important? If we had to worry about murderous rampages from every giganerd out there we'd be 100% back in the wild west. Events like Comicon would be an absolute bloodbath.

Don't get me wrong, I'd love for the country to shift more towards gun control, while revamping police culture and duties. Imagine waiting for the Uvalde police, in their current state, to come save you.

Board footer

Privacy Policy - © 2022 Jeff Minard