Announcement

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Kmar
Truth is my Bitch
+5,695|5359|132 and Bush

--------------------------------Scheduled Launch Time:25 September 2009 08:00:00 EDT

Watch at Space Flight now
Live streaming video and an interactive chat
begins at 6 a.m. EDT (1000 GMT) on launch day.

https://i37.tinypic.com/11148d0.jpg
Delta 2 rocket set for Cape launch Friday morning

Awaiting blastoff from Cape Canaveral on Friday is a Delta 2 rocket topped with two experimental missile-tracking satellites built to demonstrate advanced technologies for the nation's defense against enemy attacks. Liftoff is targeted for 8:00 a.m.
https://i34.tinypic.com/2duhax.jpg

0448 GMT 12:48 a.m. EDT)
Rollback of mobile tower is underway.
0145 GMT (9:45 p.m. EDT Thurs.)
The xenon spotlights have been turned on to shine brightly upon the Delta 2 rocket at launch pad 17B. The gantry-like mobile service tower will be retracted by ground crews a little later tonight to reveal the booster in the final hours before blastoff carrying the two Space Tracking and Surveillance System demonstration satellites. Liftoff remains on target for 8 a.m. EDT.
https://i36.tinypic.com/2cg1px0.jpg
This graphic shows how the U.S. military's experimental Space Tracking Surveillance System satellites are expected to
track missiles from orbit. Credit: Northrop Grumman.


The Missile Defense Agency is pursuing the Space Tracking and Surveillance System (STSS) program as a space-based sensor component of the Ballistic Missile Defense System (BMDS). Using sensors capable of detecting visible and infrared light, the Space Tracking and Surveillance System constellation of satellites will become part of a collection of land-, sea-, air-, and space-based BMDS sensors.

The Mission
The Missile Defense Agency is pursuing the Space Tracking and Surveillance System (STSS) program as a space-based sensor component of the Ballistic Missile Defense System (BMDS). Using sensors capable of detecting visible and infrared light, the Space Tracking and Surveillance System constellation of satellites will become part of a collection of land-, sea-, air-, and space-based BMDS sensors.
Overview
  • Two research and development satellites will be launched into low earth orbit in 2009.
  • A ground segment has been developed to operate the satellites and provide an interface to the BMDS.
  • The STSS Demonstration Program will demonstrate the key functions of a space-based sensor, passing missile tracking data to missile defense interceptors with the accuracy and timeliness necessary to enable them to successfully intercept missile targets.
  • Lessons learned from the on-orbit operation of the demonstration satellites will provide a foundation to proceed with the fielding of an operational constellation.
Initial Program
  • The demonstration satellites have completed buildup, integration, systems testing, and environmental testing, and are in final prelaunch preparation.
  • Two satellites will be launched together on a single Delta II launch vehicle in 2009.
  • The STSS ground station is currently functional and is being used to train and certify operators. The ground segment will communicate with the BMDS Command and Control, Battle Management and Communication system.
  • The STSS will perform on-orbit testing of sensor performance against ground targets, airborne targets and short and long range ballistic missile targets.
  • The demonstration satellites are expected to be available for two to four years after launch.
Next Steps
  • The Missile Defense Agency will use early on-orbit testing of the Demonstration Program satellites to refine software and processes to enhance the usefulness of the demonstration satellites.
  • On-orbit satellites will test and demonstrate key knowledge areas in 2009/2010:
  • Birth-to-death tracking of strategic and tactical missiles.
  • Ability to hand-off timely midcourse track data to the BMDS kill chain.
  • Integrated space-based tracking in support of missile defense.
  • Upgrading ground station and spacecraft software will improve the demonstration satellites and reduce risk for future satellite development.
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Ioan92
Member
+337|4480
I somehow have a bad feeling about this.
Kmar
Truth is my Bitch
+5,695|5359|132 and Bush

I posted this mostly for the Euros. 8am is one of the three hours i usually sleep.
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Kmar
Truth is my Bitch
+5,695|5359|132 and Bush

I shot this when they launched Kepler on the back of a Delta II a few months ago.

115 miles from the launch pad, at night.
https://i35.tinypic.com/27ytsnm.jpg

Separation
https://farm4.static.flickr.com/3391/3335763977_6d701dc1b4_o.jpg
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Hurricane2k9
Pendulous Sweaty Balls
+1,538|4460|College Park, MD
I don't think I'll be up at 5AM to watch some pedestrian rocket launch


call me when it's STS-129
https://static.bf2s.com/files/user/36793/marylandsig.jpg
Kmar
Truth is my Bitch
+5,695|5359|132 and Bush

Hurricane2k9 wrote:

I don't think I'll be up at 5AM to watch some pedestrian rocket launch


call me when it's STS-129
haha.. you've never seen a Delta II go up. It's a big candle. That would be 8am on the east coast.
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Kmar
Truth is my Bitch
+5,695|5359|132 and Bush

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Hurricane2k9
Pendulous Sweaty Balls
+1,538|4460|College Park, MD

Kmarion wrote:

Hurricane2k9 wrote:

I don't think I'll be up at 5AM to watch some pedestrian rocket launch


call me when it's STS-129
haha.. you've never seen a Delta II go up. It's a big candle. That would be 8am on the east coast.
I'm on the west coast now
https://static.bf2s.com/files/user/36793/marylandsig.jpg
Kmar
Truth is my Bitch
+5,695|5359|132 and Bush

Hurricane2k9 wrote:

Kmarion wrote:

Hurricane2k9 wrote:

I don't think I'll be up at 5AM to watch some pedestrian rocket launch


call me when it's STS-129
haha.. you've never seen a Delta II go up. It's a big candle. That would be 8am on the east coast.
I'm on the west coast now
what the hell?

you may sleep in then .
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Benzin
Member
+576|4756
30 minutes until launch! (countdown in the OP is incorrect)
DonFck
Hibernator
+3,227|5390|Finland

What, no onboard cam?

The engine separations looked cool and the launch acceleration speed surprised me.
I need around tree fiddy.
Mekstizzle
WALKER
+3,609|5379|London, England

DonFck wrote:

What, no onboard cam?

The engine separations looked cool and the launch acceleration speed surprised me.
Yeah, you can just go crazy and go as fast as you can when there's no humans on board. The rocket launches then look more like the launches of your bottle rockets except on a massive scale
Benzin
Member
+576|4756
Very cool launch, girlfriend and I were watching the updates waiting for the launch to finally occur.
Kmar
Truth is my Bitch
+5,695|5359|132 and Bush

CapnNismo wrote:

30 minutes until launch! (countdown in the OP is incorrect)
I saw they delayed it after i signed off..
http://twitter.com/NASA/statuses/4367106928
STSS Demo mission launched at 820aET. Final spacecraft separation from the Delta II rocket is at approx 915 a.m.
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Kmar
Truth is my Bitch
+5,695|5359|132 and Bush

Replay
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Mekstizzle
WALKER
+3,609|5379|London, England
One thing I've always wondered is why do the rockets start going sideways after awhile. Or is it that it just looks like from the ground that because of the rotation of the earth. Or is it because it's easier to go up like that instead of doing it straight, or is going sideways because so it goes into the right place in orbit. Or is it a combination of all those factors, plus some other stuff.
Surgeons
U shud proabbly f off u fat prik
+3,097|5247|Gogledd Cymru

It's to do with being easier to break the atmosphere plus so it stays in orbit and doesn't drift away form the earth.
Kmar
Truth is my Bitch
+5,695|5359|132 and Bush

Mekstizzle wrote:

One thing I've always wondered is why do the rockets start going sideways after awhile. Or is it that it just looks like from the ground that because of the rotation of the earth. Or is it because it's easier to go up like that instead of doing it straight, or is going sideways because so it goes into the right place in orbit. Or is it a combination of all those factors, plus some other stuff.
It looks like that from the ground. It's up, then up-east. They use the earths rotation to get a natural gravitational boost. That is why they prefer to launch from Fl. If something should go wrong it would be over open water. Also the closer you are to the equator the greater the assist is from the earths rotation.
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Kmar
Truth is my Bitch
+5,695|5359|132 and Bush

Mekstizzle wrote:

One thing I've always wondered is why do the rockets start going sideways after awhile. Or is it that it just looks like from the ground that because of the rotation of the earth. Or is it because it's easier to go up like that instead of doing it straight, or is going sideways because so it goes into the right place in orbit. Or is it a combination of all those factors, plus some other stuff.
I found a good illustration.

This was obviously shot south of the launch.

https://i36.tinypic.com/ilx4wk.jpg
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mcminty
Moderating your content for the Australian Govt.
+879|5479|Sydney, Australia
Hah damn that started off fast.


Lol, a few days ago I mentioned to some friends that I'd always wanted to see a shuttle launch... and that since I can't, I watch the launch online. They couldn't understand why I would do such a thing. But of course they've never seen one, real OR as a video..

/facepalm
Kmar
Truth is my Bitch
+5,695|5359|132 and Bush

irl @ KSC you don't just see the launch. You feel it.. all around you.
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Zombie_Affair
Amputee's...BOOP
+78|4573|Fattest Country in the world.
Chamber pressure levels, the chamber pressure readings on the 'burniers'? and good symetrical burn on ground lit solid motors. 22 seconds into the flight. Still looking good, altitude now bout' a half a mile, 32 seconds vehicle now passing mach 1. Vehicle now going transonic. Chamber pressure now beginning to decline on the six ground lit motors as expected. 47 seconds in now passing mach II, maximum dynamic pressure in the 'vehicle'? 55 seconds in less then 10 seconds remain on our solid burn, standing by for solid 'sep(eration)'? and we have seperation, seperation on the six solid motors and we have a good ignition on the 3 air lit 'solids'?
Hard to understand, maybe the accent.
Kmar
Truth is my Bitch
+5,695|5359|132 and Bush

DonFck wrote:

What, no onboard cam?

The engine separations looked cool and the launch acceleration speed surprised me.
A Delta II with a camera,

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Benzin
Member
+576|4756

Kmarion wrote:

DonFck wrote:

What, no onboard cam?

The engine separations looked cool and the launch acceleration speed surprised me.
A Delta II with a camera,

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IvB-8CWw9eU
Very awesome!

I can't wait until they land on the moon again. That is going to be awesome. I hope they broadcast it in HD!

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